The importance on an adequate warmup and stretch

Make at least 10 minutes for  warmup before getting started and at least 10 minutes for a stretch at the end of your workout. In this post we will be talking about the advantages and disadvantages of each. Also we will cover what is an adequate amount of stretch.

IF Stretch

first off we should look at the definition of Passive static stretch (PSS) and active dynamic warmup (AD). 

Dynamic stretching: A form of active movement that isn’t about holding a stretch but rather taking your body through ranges of motion that will better prepare you for your workout or sporting activity.

Static stretching: A stretch is held in a challenging but comfortable position for a period of time, usually somewhere between 10 to 30 seconds. Static stretching is the most common form of stretching found in general fitness and is considered safe and effective for improving overall flexibility.

What is the difference between the two? When doing both static stretching and dynamic stretching before and after your workout, you can improve your results and better your performance as a whole. The only thing is, we get confused on when each one should be used. Over time there have been studies showing that Dynamic stretching should be done as a warmup and Static being done at the end of your workout. Why is this? Static stretch beforehand can weaken performance, such as sprint speed. Dynamic stretches are meant to mimic the movements your joints and muscles go through in a specific sport or activity.

What happens to your muscles while stretching can explain why this is. When stretching while your muscles are cold it can actually cause injuries. Static stretches improve your joint range of motion if done after your workout using the stretch reflex process. The muscle could be overstretched.